Info of Chemical Matrixectomy

In addition care should be taken to fully evaluate the patient for any associated benign or malignant tumors involving the nail before performing a chemical matrixectomy. Although rare, any unusual “proud flesh” or unusual pigmentation of the nail bed should be biopsied before performing a chemical matrixectomy. Such benign tumors include warts(periungual and subungual), fibroma, neurofibroma, pigmented nevus, pyogenic granuloma(periungual and subungual), glomus tumor,myxoid cyst, acquired digital fibrokeratoma,keratoacanthoma, bone cysts including subungual exostosis,osteochondroma,enchondroma. Malignant tumors include bowens disease,metastatic carcinoma most commonly associated with a club appearing nail, basal cell carcinoma,malignant melanoma, and squamous cell carcinoma(the most common malignant cancer see associated with ingrown nails. If there is any clinical suspicious findings which could indicate any of the above conditions the patient should be advised of this and appropriate biopsy carried out.

There are also associated biomechanical etiologies of ingrown toenails that can be considered before performing a chemical matrixectomy. For example hallux abducto valgus deformity that is severe enough to cause the lateral border of the nail to impinge against the medial border of the 2nd toe causing the nail fold to overgrow the nail plate and thus causing the nail margin to embed within the tissue. In this situation the patient should be at least advised on the underlying etiology and at least given the option to trying a simple pad between the toes as an alternative to a chemical matrixectomy.